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still with us? are you still with us? they were not sure -- these guys will tell you here, they were not sure who was what, where was where, in our situation. i would say -- i would not say they forgot about us, but there were times that we felt like we were forgotten about, because they blew us east of the airport, probably 60 miles before they turned us back -- flew us east of the airport, and all the time asking, are you still with us? it was just total mass confusion all over. >> i wanted to thank the four of you for your actions that day and what you continue to do for us. i question is for the commercial pilot. i was wondering how you decided to tell the passengers what was going on. did you consider lying to them? [laughter] a small bump in the aircraft, you know. >> that would be a hard-line to cover up. the best policy was just to be honest with them. they are all in a life-and-death situation, and had every right to know that. the moment that i knew that everyone's life was somewhat in danger and at risk, i let them know. i tell them, as far as i know, we are at work. >> i
visit us whenever you can and your always ready to jump in whenever we need you. we could not have done this without you so we're honored to have you with us today. please welcome our governor, our partner and our friend. wed wa edward g. rendale. >> good morning. when richard and i first visited this site my first years governor i didn't know what a profound effect it would have on us. >> the pennsylvania legislature could not agree unanimously that today is saturday. [laughter] when flight 93 crossed into pennsylvania, the fight to defend and protect our country was already underway. it was a fight that would be one at great cost. the cost of 40 wonderful lives. from the moment that the plane hit the ground, the names of these pennsylvania and became indelibly etched into the history of the commonwealth of pennsylvania. along with benjamin franklin, who committed treason and risked his life to give birth to this new nation. all along with general george marshall of uniontown, who helped to lead the allied war effort in world war ii, and his secretary of state help to rebuild our alli
in the investigation and recovery efforts are with us in the audience today. for the first responders, around -- a round of applause. [applause] this is also the place where the media gave the nation and the world their first glimpse of the crash site. this is the place where a community in nation came together, the red cross and salvation army and good samaritans demonstrated great compassion and care here. local residents of this community and county opened their home andeart to the families and to the nation. a small memorial of pay bills was placed at the overlook where families could leave -- of hay bales was placed at the overlook where families could leave flowers and other items. still adding we're to that simple memorial. the nation in the world have joined the salute. you will hear from distinguished speakers today. i want to impart with you the confidence that the department of the interior, in our capacity as to words of national parks and historic sites for our great nation, is committed to building this memorl. because of the work here, we're on our way, with the friends and fam
in the united states -- which is part of what's going to keep us growing and keep us innovative -t companies are strongly incentivized to do that. making sure that their expensing accelerated business depreciation is happening in 2011, so that if companies are sort of sitting on the sidelines right now, not sure whether they should invest, let's give them incentive to go ahead and invest now to give that a jumpstart. on infrastructure, we've got a highway bill that traditionally is done every six years. and what we're saying is let's ramp up what we're doing, let's beef it up a little bit -- because we've got this infrastructure all across the country that everybody from governors to mayors to economists to engineers of all political stripes have said is holding us back in terms of our long-term competitiveness -- let's get started now rebuilding america. and in terms of paying for some of these things, let's stop giving tax breaks to companies that are shipping jobs overseas, let's stop incentivizing that. let's give tax breaks to companies that are investing right here in the united states
to deal, even with current law, one is to make sure that we can use our accountability law and our anti-dumping law, and our import safety laws to make sure they are protected from both on fair trade practices and surges from china in imports. we are losing -- we are using those laws very effectively. we have a right, under the wto, secondly, to make sure that when china is doing something else in china that limits our excess or unfairly discriminates, we can take them to the wto and get them to stop those practices. we're using the very effectively. we have a long way to go. we are having an portent debate , region and partisan debate, not about the object -- and the important debate, not about the objective, but what additional sets of tools we can use. many of these practices have more adverse effects on other trading partners. we will try to use all those tools, and work with you and your colleagues to see if we can find better approaches. >> i appreciate your answers, and i encourage you to look at the currency reform for their trade act. with that, i will yield to the chairman. >>
. he thought for us every day. he set the standard for public service. >> and so today, my friends, my campaign for alaska's future begins. [applause] i got it. ok. i get the message, all right. i get the message. i hear it loud and clear. and i announce today that i will be a write-in candidate in november for the united states senate seat that i now hold. we're in this together. thank you. i thank you for this support and this confidence. i will tell you that when those votes came in on the 24th of august, when they were counted, there was nobody that was more disappointed than i was. but since then, things have happened, events have transpired, and there has been an outpouring of support from alaskans all over the state, from all spectrums, from all political persuasions. when i sat down at a restaurant and the waiter says, lisa, run and i will quit my job and i will come to work for you. i think he actually said he would go part-time. but this is the outpouring of support that i have received from individuals stopping me in the airport, to the diners, received on the email. it has
'll be back at 7:00 eastern time, thank you for joining us. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] >>. what's in 2007, analysts meredith whitney was the first to predict major losses for citigroup. she said -- our guest tonight on c-span's q&a. >> next, a discussion on the image of muslims in the u.s.. some of the topics are the controversy over the proposed islamic center near ground zero in york city. it is an hour and half. >> we welcome you to our briefing. and we have a distinguished panel year before you to talk about -- we call it a discussion. i want to be clear that this briefing is not about park 51. none of the panelists here are experts on the project or connected directly. this is not about park 51. the congressional muslim the staff association does not necessarily endorse the positions of the panelists here. we want to bring together experts and community leaders to talk about conversations in the wake of this controversy that is taking place all across america. it is a complex conversation that we're having right now. the muslim staff association represents a
what it's doing in the back of a box. and sometimes that's what really catches us unawares. so there is a shared responsibility between those of us now and the new generation coming. the new generation of pilots will likely have been participants in virtual reality activities. through the form of video and computer games and an interesting statistic for those who are not aware of it, we have these massively multiplayer online games. . >> the box itself, there are good advantage and good things about how it is continuing to be developed. this picture up there is actually a picture from the bowing 787 simulator. the simulators have been progressing, they are going to continue to do so, and the gap between the sim and real world is more blurred. this is not a bad thing. it can be a good thing. the biggest point is it is a reality, whether we like it or not. let's tap into the strength of as we great greater fidelity, that should be leveraged to its maximum possible ability. reaction skills are really key, and they're very good. this tool does well at that. you can get the necessar
police procedures and what not that would be used in any crime scene were used in connection with this event. mike does mention the excellent work that the fbi did piecing together the puzzle that led to the identification of the terrorists within a short period of time. however, the preventive side of it definitely became more of a military exercise. even in that regard, the fbi and department of justice had central roles to play to develop a strategy that could be implemented to look at our borders. >> there had been a number of terrorist attacks. there were the embassies in east africa. the first world trade center attack. you could even go back to the u.s. marine barracks bombing in beirut in 1983. in every case with the united states government did principally was to send out the fbi to try to find people you could identify as perpetrators so that they could be captured and prosecuted. what you hear from all of the discussion and is very important for people to focus on is that this was a different case. this was not about going out to find people who did it to punish th
. his goal was to work until he was 80. from the two of us putting down the river, i said, [laughter] my brother, john and i had a rare privilege coming up. it we followed our father to the citadel and john is a graduate of the citadel mighting 79 and myself of 1980. he went on to the dental corps as a dentist. we transferred to the jag cora and i have been on active duty several times. my status as a veteran has been extremely helpful in my committee assignments to serve you and the nation in congress. it is really unfortunate that there are not as many veterans that serve in congress today. there are probably less than 20 of us that have served in a theatre of war and is pretty stunning. not long ago, i was able to say to john dingell that i do in the in that if god had given me the choice in military or congress, i would have chosen to serve in the congress where members have served in world war ii and korea. they understood the american character. they understood a character that was formed and forced out of the course also very difficult times, and they were task through time to act
." join us with your calls, e- mail's end tweets next sunday at noon eastern on c-span3 book tv. >> now, the washington institute for near east policy post a discussion on leadership of the oilseeds of saddam hussein. documents were captured in iraq in 2003 and provided scholars with an inside view of the iraqi regime _ sought -- saddam hussein's leadership. they have archived the materials. this is about 1.5 hours. >> good afternoon ladies and gentleman. my name is michael eisenstaedt. i am a senior fellow and director of the studies program at the washington institute of near east policy. almost three years to the day this week marks the start of the iraq war. it led to a series of events in a bloody eight year war between iran and iraq which contributed to the 1991 gulf war which in turn set up a decade of sanctions and containment of iraq followed by the 2003 invasion of iraq by the united states and its coalition partners which leads us to where we are today. one of the consequences of the invasion of iraq was that the united states government's possession of massive numbers of gov
cleared, the loss was actually greater. all of us can remember where we were, what we were doing, and how we felt as the news of the attacks was broadcast over all of the news networks. most of us had the opportunity to experience those attacks through our televisions, most in the privacy of our own homes, where we were able to take in and process, and grieve over what was occurring. the people that we will be talking with today did not have that luxury of learning about the events on their televisions. these were the individuals that were on the front lines that day. they were the men and women who could not watch it on tv, but had to respond. they had to act. they had no time to grieve. they had no time to plan. they had no time to prepare. we had not prepared for what happened that day. they were called upon to improvise. their actions and their decisions could either cost lives or save lives. for me, as an airline pilot, the was not flying that day, i had a burning desire to understand what it was like for these people that were in the air traffic control facility, and the cockpit, an
street especially as we head into the november reelection. also joining us, reid wilson will look at candidates supported by the party and their success rate. our last segment, brian powell looking at the definition of a family and the acceptance of same-sex couples and unmarried couples as a definition of family. that will be tomorrow on "washington journal" plus your phone calls and a look at the papers. it starts at 7:00 a.m. we will see you then. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] . >> and after that, a confirmation hearing for jacob lew, president obama's choice to head the white house budget office. >> the conflict between the first amendment and national security "necessary secrets" author, this weekend on book tv. >> every weekend on c-span3, experience american history tv, 48 hours of people and events, telling the american story. hear historic speeches by national leaders and eyewitness accounts of events that shaped our nation. visit museums, historical sites and college campuses as professors
research, rather than having misled us, have significantly enhance o understanding of the crisis and are informing the regulatory response. the crisis did reveal some gaps in economists acknowledge that should be remedied. the financial crisis represented an enormously complex set of interactions, indeed, a discussion and ball abilities in the financial system and financial regulations that allow the crisis to have such devastating effects will more than fill my time this afternoon. the complexity of our financial syst and the resulting difficulties of predicting relevanc in one financial markets and how it affects one system as a whole part -- presents challenges. in retrospect, economic principles and research are quite useful for understanding key aspects of the crisis and for designing appropriate policy responses. for example, the dependence on some financial firms on a stable short-term findings led to applications for the functioning of the system as a whole. the fact that dependents -- dependency on short-term funding could lead to runs, -- it has been a central issue in
tougher on foreign policy. host: joan joins us from tennessee, an independent caller. caller: i am 65 years old, and i was one of the protestors of the vietnam war, marched, but of course, with age comes wisdom, and at this point, i really appreciate what president johnson was up against. even though i did not vote for him, because i don't vote, that's not cyniyism, i did vote once for the son of nancy pelosi. i think that lyndon johnson is one of the great presidents because of what he did in passing the civil rights act. he did that, even though you knew that it would cost the democratic party the white south, but he did it based on moral reasons, because he really wanted to perfect the constitution, and that passing the voting rights act, even though it would cost the democratic party the white south, he did it because it was the right thing. guest: that is such an important point, and i really congratulate you, culler, because i think nothing is more important to understand the great side of lyndon johnson than that the courage it took. he knew that it was going to cost him the so
. this is what you do. you get a cross-section. you use certain techniques. thes is no different than surveys in terms of methodologies that the surveys you read all of the time. if it is our true that our survey does not represent the pulte -- the population, then a new survey does either. regarding the question about civil unions, i think that is a very interesting question. many people say i am opposed to marriage. that conveys and means something different. there is a difference between marriage and a civil union. one difference is a very simple one. if you are married, you are in a different tax rate because you are a married couple. if you are in a civil union you are not. ironically, in many cases not being married is a financially beneficial. ironically, by not allowing same-sex couples to get married we are not getting the same taxes from them that we would get. about the 2% vs. the 98%, it has never been a question of what is the largest percentage of people and just benefiting them. the united states has always been concerned about both those with power and those without power. we
third parties and subsequently use in your operations? >> we've put in a full array of testing. we're taking samples from every incoming load. we've talked to all of our vendors for them also to do testing. we're doing a composite on these loads weekly and send them in for testing. we're going to do a monthly swabbing of our feed mill. we are currently in the process of completely cleaning and disinfecting the entire mill from top to bottom. and we've done extensive employee training to make sure that the mill is kept tightened up so that there's no open hatches as noted in the 483. >> what steps do you take to ensure that those planned or announced safeguards are implemented? >> we have a daily inspection by the mill manager. then we have an outside supervisor who is going to inspect the facilities once a week and give me a full report. >> do you still have your hog operations? >> we own some hog facilities but we don't own any -- we don't operate hog facilities. we just lease them. >> i see. mr. chairman, i note with some distress my time is up, and i thank you for your courtesy.
book "rules for radicals" is still used as a blueprint for social change. >> it defies all the stereotypes of what a rebel rouser is supposed to be. >> nicholas von hoffman writes about his experiences, tonight on c-span's "q & a". >> this week on "prime ministers questions" members return to the house of commons following their summer recess. and the deputy prime minister stood in. the deputy leader faced questioning about the prime minister's communications chief who was accused of tapping into celebrities' voicemail. he also talks about aid to flood victims in pakistan and unemployment benefits. "prime minister's questions" tonight, 9:00 p.m. eastern, on c-span. now a town hall meeting with senator tom coburn. the oklahoma convenient completing his first term in office sean running for re-election. he takes questions on issues of interests to both local residents and a national audience, mainly on health care. this is just over an hour. >> good afternoon. glad you're all here. what we're going to try to do is spend as much time as we can answering questions. the one thin
this is a letter we got from maxim u.s. we're federal services. experts on appeals. medicare hired us to review this file and decide if the partd plan made the correct decision. we work for medicare. we do not work for part-d plan. we appealed and my wife won wholly. so the administrative law judge process. maxim u.s. has appealed that a decision and they say according to the term medically accepted indication includes only fda uses and those off dated uses supported by citation on one of the listed drugs. more over, medically accepted indication does not including treating physician testimony or proffer of medical efforts showing a drug as prescribed effectively treats the condition for which it's being used. converse easily could have included expert testimony as a source material for determining medically accepted uses if he wanted to do so. instead congress by reference to a drugs fda label and expert opinions in one of several drug. accordingly. medical accept the use is not the same as medically necessary. >> i would like to, we worked on issues like that so. we could be of help to you.
for americans, and find enough support in this body and the congress. it is very important to us, as a country, that we do not leave those markets to our competitors. >> it would be your opinion that the ratification of those agreements would create jobs? >> we have to make sure that we have agreements in place that provide a good deal for american businesses and american workers. where we have strong agreements that meet that test, it will be important for us to make them law. >> with the basel discussion on the capital standards, i want to ask about capital formation. the financial reform bill changed the net worth test for meeting the accredited investors standard. did you support those changes, believing that altering the standards will impact the ability to raise capital and take companies public? >> you are testing my memory of the origin of that provision. i would be happy to look at it in more detail and come back to you. my general view, and i think it is supported by how the broader investment community reacted, is that this will provide a better system for companies to go raise capi
thereof, and there's a case called calvin's case about the citizenship that they used in the debates too and says to allegiance too, and the words to allegiance to people think it's the same of to the jurisdiction of. they have to decide when the case gets to the supreme court whether undocumented people or aliens of the united states are subject to a jurisdiction of the united states or aallegiance to. i would think they would vote yes based on cases in the 50s, but don't that. i just get as prepared as i can get. >> we're getting prepared. michelle, can you bring us to the fast forward of the state to the new jim crowe and the relationship to these discussions about what we thoughtas an underlying support system in the form of the 14th amendment? >> yes -- >> bring your mic closer. >> my title of the book is the new m crow in the new age. it's meant to be provocative in the age of obama and color blindness doesn't believe an akin currently exists in the united states. i argue that in fact, there is a system that functioning much like capped systems that we supposedly left behind. the m
, accounting, advertising. these jobs are overwhelmingly feel by u.s. workers, get these jobs disappear when forms are closed. economists believe that for every form job loss, the u.s. loses another 3.1 complementary jobs. aside from a loss of millions of jobs, the closure of american forms endangers the nation's economy and national security. our national security depends on our ability to produce a stable domestic crude supply. like oil, the more we rely on other countries for our food supply, the more recall victim to an increase trade debt, scarcity in times of drought, fluctuating eckstrom market prices, and political pressure. we would also increase the possibility of foodborne illness is and terrorist attack your nation's food supply. the security is national security. america cannot afford to stop producing its own food supply, and we need the labor force to do so. today we will hear from our panel of witnesses to better understand this complex and very important issue for americans, american jobs, our economy, and our national security. people in the media spotlight have a special a
test results for salmonella were found in both farms including in the feed mill and the water used to wash the eggs. even more alarming, during the course of its investigation, the committee has obtained records that show that write county egg tested positive for salmonella contamination in its iowa facilities prior to the widespread outbreak of the illness. environmental sample reports taken in and around the chicken cages between 2008 and 2010 indicate that write county egg received 426 positive results for salmonella including 73 that were potentially positive for salmonella en tir eye tus, the same strain that sickened 1,600 people. perhaps these findings should not be a surprise given the record of the decoster farm operation that owns the wright county egg facilities. in act, decoster farm had so many environmental and safety violations that the state of iowa declared them habitual violators and assessed a total of $219,000 in civil fines. decoster farm is the only entity to receive the habitual violater status from the state of iowa. the work of this subcommittee coupled wit
of us on the day as, you are free to wander back and get coffee. i want to thank everyone. we had a long and productive day yesterday. let me do a little housekeeping in terms of the schedule. we are supposed to have a series of three votes beginning at 11:00. so it is my intention to go without a break until those votes are called. wait until five minutes or 10 minutes into the first vote and adjourned until approximately 11:40 so everyone will have an opportunity to cast votes and we do not have to run back and forth. as soon as the third vote is cast, i will ask you to come back quickly so we can get in an hour between 11:40 and 12:40. then we will break for lunch and resume at 2:30. it is my intention to stay as late, almost as late as we did yesterday and hopefully we can get a lot more done. there was an objection yesterday come at a -- a motion by the house to admit into evidence that was 302. we have visited with our counsel and senator hatch and i have visited about it. the inclination is to not admit the 300 to as evidence for the same reasons we did not grand jury testimony in
to improve not just certain ones. that is the main difference between us. >> you wish to rebut? >> yes. i have read my opponent's plan. in terms of it using empowerment, which we already have, it uses a program that is going to be used in a county in the very near future. i had the opportunity to visit with all 17 school superintendents. the point i think we need to make is as far as it goes, it is fun. but we need to go further. we cannot wait for the five years that is called for in my opponent's plan to change the system. by that time, thousands of children's -- children would have gone through. my plan will allow for change immediately. it will call for immediate merit pay for teachers to reward good teachers. it will call for the end of social promotion. it will give principals throughout the state the ability to have local control for the decisions and kids in their schools. thanks. >> we understand it will be hard to divorce the subject issue from this, but we want to continue with another question. the school district has led the privatizing and have found they could not save the
think will enable us to resolve all of the outstanding issues. these are legitimacy and security. just as you expect us to be ready to recognize a palestinian state as the nation state of the palestinian people, we expect you to be prepared to recognize israel as the nation-state of the jewish people. there are more than 1 million non-jews living in israel, the nation-state of the jewish people, who have a full civil rights. there's no contradiction between a nation-state that guarantees the national rights of the majority of about guaranteeing the civil rights, full civil equality, of the minority. i think this mutual recognition between us is indispensable to clarify to our two peoples that the conflict between us is over. i said, to come yesterday that a real peace must take into account the genuine security of the individual that have changed since i was last year -- since i was last year at this table. we have been here before. refashioned those two agreements 12 years ago. in these 12 years, and new forces have arisen in our region and we have had the rise of miron and missile wa
to cover my costs. we had an opportunity to have this employer take occur of us. 90% of the costs deal with the clotting factor and the medications i take. that's really where i drive up healthcare it is important to have a policy that will cover that. . >> for people who are here. first of all, i have the second of health and human services. she's charged with implementing. former insurance commissioner. snows all about this stuff. we are glad to have her on the team. somebody who helps to champion the kind of reform and rights we are going to talk about today. thank you, jim. >> i know he feels blessed to be the mayor of this wonderful town. the economy has been upper most on our minds. i had to take a series of steps now the economy is growing again. not as faf as three two. so much of the focus is to try to figure out so much of the focus they are yts >> i ran for office because even as wages and incomes were flat lining, the costs of college tooish ans were rising. healthcare was one of those issues we could no longer ignore. we konlt ignore it because the cost of healthcare had b
wanted to walk away, potentially see another million jobs lost. but we said we've got to try. and now u.s. auto industries are profitable again and hiring again, back on their feet again, on the move again. [applause] there were folks who were wondering whether we could hold the banks accountable for what they had done to taxpayers; or were skeptical about whether we could make infrastructure investments and investments in clean energy and investments in education, and hold ourselves accountable for how that money was spent. there was a lot of skepticism about what we were trying to do. and a lot of it was unpopular. but i want to remind everybody here, you did not elect me to do what was popular. you elected me to do what was right. [applause] that's what we've been fighting together for -- to do what's right. [applause] todon't have our finger out the wind to know what's right. that's why we passed health insurance reform that will make it illegal for insurance companies to deny you coverage because of a preexisting condition. [applause] historic reforms that gives over 30 million ameri
from them. guest: i think what happened is the plan to use health care as a campaign issue is the academy economy overshadowed everything. people are first and foremost concerned about having a job. you need to have a job first. that is where people's minds seem to be. host: what else did you hear from the secretary? guest: she talked about the health insurance companies and working with them. there seems to be concern on wall street about what exactly will happen when all the provisions are put in place, how well the company's react? what is their bottom line? for consumers, they should care about bettincourthat. if they do consolidate, that is an issue for people. guest: she did not give an indication that she thought there would be -- there should be a federal rate review. now, even though we are seeing some of these premium increases, she made it clear that she thinks states will have the tools they need in order to keep insurance premiums from going up on unfairly. she thinks states will be able to keep those premiums from taking effect. host: she is a former governor
that the candidates out there do not have the economic background, education to bring us out of our economic situation? caller: i think they are depending on the very secretive way of turning around our economy with the new technology that they expect to have. no one has really talked about extly what that is. host: how are you going to vote? carly fiorina in the senate race foreg whitman running governor. caller: i will vote for fiorina. i won't vote for whitman. on top of being educated, you have to have a human conscience. the: let's talk about senate race in california. barbara boxer versus carly fiorina. he will vote as an independent for carly fiorina. guest: a very democratic state. if republicans win california, they could take over the senate. that is exactly how bad a year it is. a tough race. a tough battle looms. she raised a lot of moeny ney. she is pressuring fiorina as too far right for voters. host: go to our website if you want to watch the exchange in their debate. lexington, ky. al on the democratic line. caller: i was calling to comment on the bush legacy and his legacy as what has
us he fails to unite the country. he admitted he did not succeed in that area. >> then president bush really lost his way. dik cheney took way too much control of what was going on. we saw that leading into 9/11 which really should be a day of national unity and remembrance. so much of what we were talking about yesterday was disio and how much deviciveness there is in this country. host: welcome to the program. caller: good morning. i blame most of the mainstream media for giving us this disaster. congress controlled the money. controlled by 20 # by the democrats. i get sick of any so-called republicans that sit there and don't bring that up. i question his credentials. he spend most of his time at msmbc. they give us this guy that has never run anything in his life. we'll get a response. thank yous bob. this is a big country. we have an economic down turn. people really hurt now in the country. >> including like the house. a former aid could you not take this and say they are also former staffers including legislation in washington. is this a fair piece? guest: i think so. he still
the search strategy now probably claim credit for the results. one leader in the u.s. house of representatives and declared that the surge was a failure even before it was implemented. one leader in the senate said, and i will quote "this award is lost -- this war is lost,"even as additional forces were being mobilized third. "in fact, i think we will do the reverse." these are lawmakers who accepted report from -- support from an anti-war organization that ran of full-page ad in "the new york times", a sneering, a four-star general when they refer to him as "general betray us." these are sad facts. today, we mark progress. i want to thank president obama for setting aside his past political rhetoric and recognizing the importance of this search and a diplomatic agreement signed by president bush and prime minister malaki. something is the thousand u.s. troops are still in iraq. for those -- some 50,000 u.s. troops are still in iraq. though the mission has changed, their work is no less critical. there is no stronger bullwark against the menace posed by iran than a democrati
had opportunity and a number of positions with the u.s. department of justice and putting assistant to the supreme court cases he was the number two man at the civil rights division at the department justice and the environment division and he also served as vice president and general counsel to the center for public policy where he batted it and wrote a variety of publications and legal issues of interest to business and he's contributing editor to among other things "national review" online and writes frequently for usa today, the weekly standard, and several other periodic journals. finally, professor james patterson is the fourth foundation professor of history emeritus at browne university. he is a graduate of williams college and worked as a reporter for the harvard and summer, hartford current prior to joining harvard university where he received his ph.d. in history. his recent publications include grand expectations the united states 1945 to 1974 for which he received the bancroft prize in history be read about property, from the board of education, civil rights milestone a
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